Moga (Summer 2018)

After exhaustive research I decided on Ross Lillistone's First Mate. Originally I had decided on the lug rig, but I think I've changed my mind to the spritsail. I'll probably end up trying both riggs at some point, but I definitely don't see myself making the bermuda rig.

Moga Sailboat


$650 of BS-1088 Okoume plywood. I have six sheets of 1/4" and one of 1/2".

Moga Sailboat


I originally drew everything in CAD to be cut out on a buddy's CNC router, but it's brand new and he hasn't got the software to read my files set up yet. I'm in a hurry to get this started, so I did it the old fashioned way with pencil and ruler. The quarter is for small radii like the limber holes. I used the base of a Coke can for the larger radii.

Moga Sailboat


Here's one of the bulkheads cut out. High dollar beam compass to mark out the ventilation and hatch plate holes.

Moga Sailboat


Before scarfing the 4x8 sheets together I wanted to get a bit of practice using epoxy. I primed both 1/2" centerboard pieces with neat epoxy, then slathered on a healthy layer of thickened epoxy and weighted it down. Two drywall screws preserve the alignment and were removed after the epoxy started to harden. Saran wrap keeps the whole thing from getting stuck to the bench.

Moga Sailboat


The next day I attacked with an angle grinder and flap disk to give it a bit of a foil shape. I intend to reinforce the edges with thickened epoxy when I get around to fiberglassing the outside.

Moga Sailboat


Armed with my epoxy practice I started in on scarfing the plywood sheets. These are 1/4" thick, so I set them back 2" for a 8:1 slope. Each layer is screwed to the one below at the edges.

Moga Sailboat


Then I started planing out the stair steps. Probably not the best plane for this job, but it was the one I keep in my tool bucket and the rest were 30 minutes away at my folk's house.

Moga Sailboat


It's a bit wavy in places, but a decent first attempt I guess. I'll make sure there's enough thickened epoxy to fill any gaps.

Moga Sailboat


Next I taped some plastic to the garage floor and glued it down.

Moga Sailboat


I snapped a chalk line near the edge to give me a good datum and marked out the points for one of the planks. I don't have a 16' batten so I used a piece of shoe moulding to mark out the curve.

Moga Sailboat


Eventually I got the bottom, side planks, and most of the other parts cut out. I still have one full sheet of 1/4" and a fair amount of the 16' panels to use for decking and laminating the rest of the parts (mast step, mast partner, rudder, cheek filler pieces, cleat pads, etc.) I also have the ubiquitous box of scrap that's too small to keep, but too big to throw out.

Moga Sailboat


Here's a shot of all the smaller parts.

Moga Sailboat


The heros of this part of the build.

Moga Sailboat


Next I drilled some holes along the edges of the panels and started zip tying them together. The edges pulled up together nicely, my marks for the bulkheads are lining up, and everything seems to be the right length. I'm a little surprised at how well it's going.

Moga Sailboat


Does this count as the whisky plank?

Moga Sailboat


The hull is zip tied together with most of the bulkheads sitting in place. It's really satisfying how well everything is coming together after spending weeks jigsawing out pieces and planing them to size.

Moga Sailboat


Eventually I got all the bulkheads ziptied in place and the first problem has popped up. The planks are quite a bit taller than the bulkheads! I'm pretty sure the problem is due to how I drew them. I put the nails for the batten right on the points I measured, and I doubt I cut right down to the line, so the planks grew a bit. I plan to use a batten to draw a fair line to the tops of the bulkheads and then plane to shape.

Moga Sailboat


Next I taped the seams with 4" x 12oz biaxial fiberglass tape. First I put on a blob of thickened epoxy between the zipties as a sort of tack weld to hold the panels together. After it cured, I cut the zipties and brushed on neat epoxy along the seam before placing the fiberglass tape. Then I followed it up with more epoxy until the tape was wet through but not so much that it floated. I started up in the bow section to get some practice as this area will be covered by the deck.

Moga Sailboat


I positioned precut strips of fiberglass tape to save time. On the two largest sections it was a real struggle to get everything wet out before the epoxy started to set.

Moga Sailboat


Eventually I got all the seams glued together with epoxy and fiberglass tape.

Moga Sailboat


RIP zip ties. I had these spaced about 12" apart which is probably way closer together than what's actually needed.

Moga Sailboat


I laminated a layer of 4oz fiberglass cloth to what will be the inside of the centerboard trunk. I followed this up with three coats of epoxy.

Moga Sailboat


Then I epoxied on the bed logs for the centerboard trunk onto the other side. These are made from 3/4" pine.

Moga Sailboat